The Entertainer: Jovino Santos Neto

Jovino Santos Neto at the keyboard in the Royal Room in Columbia City, Seattle.

Jovino Santos Neto at the keyboard in the Royal Room in Columbia City, Seattle.

I knew his son, Ariel, before I knew Jovino Santos Neto. Ariel was a student, in 1999, in a prestigious program, the Urban Newspaper Workshop, conducted by The Seattle Times, where I worked at the time. During the grueling interview session for the workshop, Ariel mentioned that his father was a jazz musician. I knew of Jovino Santos Neto, but like a lot of ethnic-ignorant people associated Neto as his last name. Ariel went by Santos. Duh.

If you’ve ever witnessed Jovino in concert, you would not have forgotten him. No way. And if you’ve heard him — on CD or radio — you can imagine him. He performs with an energy that easily matches that in his music. He works harder, and has more fun, than anyone I’ve ever seen on the keyboards. For him the bench at the piano is just a physical construct, not any sort of boundary or limitation.
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Performance Art: Jazz

Andy Clausen (left) looks on as Riley Mulherkar takes a solo on trumpet at the Royal Room.

Andy Clausen (left) looks on as Riley Mulherkar takes a solo on trumpet at the Royal Room.

I met a mother of a jazz drummer last night during the amazing performance by Thomas Marriott and Joe Locke at Tula’s and, as I was explaining my enthusiasm for photographing artists in performance, realized that a lot of my jazz work is not present on this blog. So I’m rectifying some of that.
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My Best of SIFF 2013

This was the 39th year of SIFF.

This was the 39th year of SIFF.

The Seattle International Film Festival (SIFF) ended two weeks ago, I know, but I gave up six weeks of my life to the festival and had some catching up to do!

SIFF started a little rough for me, as I was embroiled in an effort to get SIFF to release a privacy policy for data it claimed it didn’t collect, then said it wouldn’t use but did. This issue was covered by The Seattle Weekly, mostly from my point of view.

I also had a front-row view of a patron who sat in the wrong seat at Pacific Place, virtually dared management to toss him and then was (tossed). Finally, I was at a benefit screening of DECODING ANNIE PARKER, when the projector at The Egyptian broke down about a third of the way through the film. In retrospect, this was a signal of things happening behind the theater’s impending closing.

That all said, I saw more screenings (111, including Smoke Screenings and a couple duplicates) than ever, but also a higher percentage of films I really enjoyed. I offer this list because it might help you decide when some/many of these become available at the theater, Netflix, iTunes, etc. My tolerance of films usually is pretty high; if I find one aspect (story, direction, acting, cinematography) that is redeeming, I will have considered myself entertained. However, seeing this many films in such a compressed period of time also gives me a lot more context.

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