The Photographic Life is a Beach

Little Hunter's Beach in Acadia National Park.
Little Hunter's Beach in Acadia National Park

Little Hunter’s Beach in Acadia National Park

As much as I’ve tried to drive home the importance of planning and preparation during the first three installments of this series, there are of course times to make the best of what you get.

If you’ve been paying close attention, you’ll have noticed that, in addition to discussing a different scene in a different part of the country, I’ve been moving through different parts of the day. My last post (Duck on Branch) was midday, a time usually spent at lunch. Today, we’re looking at the dead of afternoon, a time also better spent doing something else.
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Duck on Branch (Be Prepared)

A male Wood Duck at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge.
A male Wood Duck at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge.

A male Wood Duck at Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge.

NISQUALLY, Wash. — During winter, I usually am toting my long lens and often run into hunters.

“Big lens,” many will comment.

“Big gun,” I usually reply.

Though a lot of birders and wildlife photographers bristle, I enjoy my encounters with hunters. After all, we’re both looking for the same thing, and we’re both going to shoot it, albeit me with a camera. We also both usually have gathered intelligence the other can use.
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Sol Duc Splash

Salmon Cascades in Sol Duc Valley, Olympic National Park
Salmon Cascades in Sol Duc Valley, Olympic National Park

Salmon Cascades in Sol Duc Valley, Olympic National Park

If you’ve ever been photographically challenged by the likes of the indifferent dog, recalcitrant relative or churlish child, try Mother Nature on for size. She can be as fickle as any subject, requiring planning, alternatives and flexibility.

To wit, I recently visited my “home” national park, Olympic (Wash.), with the goal of shooting Sol Duc Falls, one of the most photographed waterfalls anywhere. The weather was supposed to be cooperative – cloudy, which is the usual state of affairs in the Pacific Northwest, even in the spring and summer. Clouds and forest are allies when photographing moving water, which we’ll discuss in a moment.

However, I failed to come up with anything special, even after returning early the next morning. On the access road out, I stopped at a marked spot, “Salmon Cascades,” that I reflexively passed three times before because of a camera icon on the sign, which said to me that everybody and their brother made a cheap picture there.
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